Your ‘Harry Potter’ Hogwarts House Can Predict How You Respond To Trauma

in Featured, Harry Potter, Movies

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Credit: Harry Potter

Every Harry Potter fan knows that each Hogwarts house represents a series of values and morals, and those wizards in each household and reflect those morals.

Harry Potter
Credit: Warner Bros.

Gryffindor values bravery, daring, nerve and chivalry; Hufflepuff values hard work, dedication, patient loyalty, and fair play; Ravenclaw values intelligence, knowledge, curiosity, creativity, and wit; Slytherin values ambition, leadership, self-preservation cunning, and resourcefulness.

Related: Wizarding World of ‘Harry Potter’ Team Looks to “Explore and Expand”

Similar to the house values, there is also a theory that says that the way you respond to trauma, or danger, can be correlated to your Hogwarts house. The theory comes from a TikToker named @zinniamakes. Zinn is a trainee art therapist that specializes in trauma, and of course, she is a Harry Potter fan (and a hard working and proud Hufflepuff!).

The theory states that there are four ways that the human brain and body typically react when faced with a traumatic situation or danger: fight, flight, freeze, and fawn. The response is known in psychology as the four ‘Fs’.

@zinniamakes

reposting because this did not get the love it deserved 💛❤️💚💙 #hogwarts #hptrauma #trauma #fyp #gryffindor #hufflepuff #ravenclaw #slytherin

♬ original sound – zinn

The theory says that each Hogwarts house values can help you predict how you will respond in a traumatic situation.

  • Gryffindors are born fighters, so, they will probably fight
  • Ravenclaws will tend to flee (physically or mentally) because that is the most “logical” response, remove yourself from the trauma or danger
  • Hufflepuffs tend to freeze because they don’t want to do anything that would escalate the situation or make the conflict bigger
  • Slytherins tend to submit to the ideals of those who inflict the trauma to regain some control/power over the situation

The more detailed representation of each house is explained by Zinn in the video below.

@zinniamakes

Reply to @courtneyr113 ✨UPDATED THEORY! ✨ #hogwarts #hptrauma #trauma #fyp #gryffindor #hufflepuff #ravenclaw #slytherin #update #growth #pleasewatch

♬ Harry Potter – The Intermezzo Orchestra

Zinn’s logic behind defining the way people from each Hogwarts house would respond is based on the Harry Potter books, and her personal experience talking to different people from each house about trauma.

Related: How Much Are Your ‘Harry Potter’ Books Worth?

However, as many wizarding fans know, just because the sorting hat sorts you to a specific house, it doesn’t mean your values are only those of your house. For example, take Hermione — she is a brave and daring Gryffindor, but no one can deny she values her intelligence and has an itching curiosity for knowledge. After all, she is always the one searching through piles of books for answers. So the same goes for this theory!

In her TikTok videos, Zinn gives the example of when Ginny Weasley is passed by Tom Riddle in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.

@zinniamakes

Reply to @max_sees_stars a little clarification on this video that BLEW UP, wow! 💛 #hogwarts #hptrauma #trauma #fyp #loveyou #traineetherapist

♬ Harry Potter – The Intermezzo Orchestra

Credit: Giphy

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This also applies to the trauma theory. Just because you belong to a certain Hogwarts house, it doesn’t mean you will respond to trauma the same way your house would, or the same way every time.

So, you don’t have to have that specific trauma response to be part of a specific Hogwarts house. Each person will respond to trauma differently, depending on their feelings and the situation you are in. That being said, it is interesting to see if this theory matches your Hogwarts house!

So, what did you think of the Hogwarts house trauma response theory? Do you agree with your house response? Let us know in the comments below.

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