Comments for Federal Judge Sides with Disney in Disability Lawsuit

Disney World Disability Lawsuit

10 Comments

  1. rozalen jane pober

    Thank Goodness Disney prevailed. The guest assistance card is a very fair option for those who can’t wait comfortably in line for rides. People have such nerve demanding immediate access, overshadowing the rights of all other guests. I will be using the card on my next visit, which I hope will be sooner rather than later.

    1. Melanie Durham

      I agree! We use it for our son who is autistic and he has no problem bring redirected! Yes, I do understand how it is when one cannot redirect your child! But it is what it is and it is a fair system! If you cannot control you’re child, well….

    2. Denise B.

      The problem with this decision is that it’s viewing autism in one-size-fits-all view. There are different levels of autism. Our son is on the far end of the spectrum as he is severely autistic and nonverbal. We cannot predict his moods, outbursts, limitations, etc., at any one time. We cannot predict how long we would be able to spend in the parks before he hits the wall and we need to leave. Getting on rides as quickly as possible would keep him continuously occupied lessening the chances of a meltdown. That still doesn’t guarantee that he would be able to endure a whole day in the park, but it would ensure that he would have gotten some enjoyment while we were there and his mood held up.

      Also, other parents with autistic children shouldn’t be comparing their situation with others’. They all differ.

  2. Pete Brown

    This is the correct decision. We have visited the Disneyland Resort several times with our autistic grandson. He had some difficulties, but coming back to ride was not a major one. More difficult were the darkness and loud noises encountered in some adventures. This lawsuit was unconscionable, and the lawyer should be censured and fined for his actions.

  3. Rosie

    While correct decision was made i wish they bring back the other pass for us whom need alternate entrances etc. That is unfair to just assume this is all ok! I think as long as theres a real reason for it there should be options to what the need is. I do not mind waiting but there needs to be options to how and why just like you can go on the experience and get fps! Oh and please stop screwing us over w virtual systems and we have to wait twice!

  4. Tara

    I agree with the judge. Although it would be nice to be able to just walk up and get on the ride, abuse of the system made it impossible. This is our best option. My autistic teen doesn’t have an issue with a return time.

  5. Denise B.

    The problem with this decision is that it’s viewing autism in one-size-fits-all view. There are different levels of autism. Our son is on the far end of the spectrum as he is severely autistic and nonverbal. We cannot predict his moods, outbursts, limitations, etc., at any one time. We cannot predict how long we would be able to spend in the parks before he hits the wall and we need to leave. Getting on rides as quickly as possible would keep him continuously occupied lessening the chances of a meltdown. That still doesn’t guarantee that he would be able to endure a whole day in the park, but it would ensure that he would have gotten some enjoyment while we were there and his mood held up.

    Also, other parents with autistic children shouldn’t be comparing their situation with others’. They all differ.

    1. NotMe

      Sorry, but just no. How long someone can stay in the park, regardless of why, should have no bearing on has quickly they can get onto a ride. If you can stay in the park for two hours, then you should be able to experience the same number of attractions that a non-disabled guest can experience in two hours. If he isn’t able to experience enough to make it worth the trip, then perhaps you should reconsider Disney as a vacation spot.

      And no one was comparing their situation with anyone else, they’re simply saying it works for their family member.

  6. Greg Batson

    Good for Disney.

    I have sever anxiety and panic attacks and I have trouble waiting in some of those long snaking queues and have attacks if the line isn’t moving.

    I use the current pass and it works fine. I don’t expect to be able to skip the line in front of people that wait 2 hours. If there is still am attraction that has a queue that might give me issues(like the new Peter Pan) I just don’t rid ethat attraction.

    Simple as that!

  7. NotMe

    Sorry, but just no. How long someone can stay in the park, regardless of why, should have no bearing on has quickly they can get onto a ride. If you can stay in the park for two hours, then you should be able to experience the same number of attractions that a non-disabled guest can experience in two hours. If he isn’t able to experience enough to make it worth the trip, then perhaps you should reconsider Disney as a vacation spot.

    And no one was comparing their situation with anyone else, they’re simply saying it works for their family member.

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